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What Nelson Mandela can Teach Business Owners

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: September 27, 2017

“If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart.” 
― Nelson Mandela

One of the most inspiring figures in history, Nelson Mandela’s legacy is simply incredible. Everyone knows about his  work in fighting apartheid and leading South Africa. Yet, as inspiring as he is, one of his pithiest quotes is often forgotten.

In a world driven by information and communication, it is striking how many companies still have the attitude that everyone speaks English, so professional translation and interpreting are pointless. The bare facts show them to be wrong.

The All Party Parliamentary Group for languages has shown that, in the United Kingdom alone, companies miss out on £48 billion worth of contracts each year due to a lack of language skills. Research from Common Sense Advisory has found that 75% of consumers prefer to buy in their native language and nearly 60% of consumers will never or only rarely buy from English-only websites.

And, no, machine translation is not enough to bridge the gap. We only need to peruse the numerous examples of poor machine translation found around the web (supreme court beef, anyone?) to see why professionals are still needed. When it comes to interpreting, the results are even more striking, as can be seen from this video of a so-called “translation earpiece” in action.

Human professionals will always deliver a better job. Only last year, I helped a company land a seven figure contract by smoothing out a cultural misunderstanding during an interpreting assignment. Machines won’t do that. At best, they just tell you what the person said.

Interpreting makes a difference. You will always be more convincing when working with a professional than you will be without them. If you are looking for your business to reach international markets and persuade buyers who don’t speak your language, it’s time we talked. Drop me an email to see the difference professional interpreter can make to you.

Interpreters Climb Inside Your Head for a Living

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: August 30, 2017

Yesterday, I talked about why preparing for an interpreting assignment involves a whole lot more than just looking up terminology. Today, I want to take that a bit further. As I am realising with this job especially, interpreters have to do more than understand what you are saying, we need to get inside your head.

 

There is one particular speaker at this event. When I read his speech, I can understand him on one level. When I watch him on YouTube, I understand him better but I will learn the most about him by doing deeper research on his writing, his affiliations and the things he has done in his work. Nine times out of ten, the trickiest terminological and phraseological issues are resolved by context, not by dictionaries. If I want to understand what someone is saying, I need to understand what they are trying to do with what they are saying.

 

For a trained interpreter, that is well-trodden ground. Most of us will have heard of or have been trained in speech act theory – the idea that people do things with the words they say. But when you are interpreting, you need to go even further than that. To interpret someone well, you need to really get a hold of why they are saying what they are saying and who they are saying it too. Even more, you need to be able to figure out the best way to project that to a brand new audience – one they might never meet or talk to personally.

 

To allow yourself to be interpreted is to trust someone to produce a version of what you said in another language that means the same thing somehow. They become your voice and your door to an entirely new culture. As long as you are being interpreted, you live in two (or more!) languages and cultures at once.

 

At this conference, it is clear that speakers will be trying to convince and argue, persuade and prompt, debate and describe. For our interpreting to even come close to working, we will need to figure out ways to allow them to do that an entirely different language, with entirely different ways of convincing, arguing, persuading, prompting, debating and describing. And all that while having no control over the pace or technicality or even clarity of the words we hear. It’s hard work but it is always worth it.

Do event platforms work?

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: August 16, 2017

It seems that at least once a quarter, some new event sourcing platform will pop up. This blog has already discussed the possibilites and drawbacks of venue sourcing sites but, with more and more companies trying to be the next big directory of everything event managers need, perhaps it’s time to think about how things work from the other side. Are event platforms any good for suppliers? Do they actually get you work?

The answer to that question will, of course, depend on the platform and the supplier. However, there are good reasons to doubt that event platforms will create the market disruption they often claim.

To see why, let’s take a lesson from translation and interpreting. There, despite a parallel market trend to the events industry, with platforms springing up like weeds along a driveway, there are still one or two major players who dominate the scene. The biggest and best established, is ProZ.com, which has taken its size and age and turned them into advantages by launching revenue producing conferences, courses and virtual events.

Yet even a cursory glance of the discussion of the platform among industry insiders will reveal a very mixed picture. While it is entirely possible for someone to pick up clients there – and indeed many still do – much of the best work seems to come via individual direct contact.

In other words, the very best that a platform like that can do for a supplier is to function as a website. The problem with that is that it is a website that the supplier has little control over and which does not give them the kind of fine-grained data that most good website owners would use to improve their sales and marketing.

In addition, it is no secret that the jobs that come through platforms tend not to be at the very top of the price tree. Largely, the high value projects are still allocated based on personal contact and prior relationship. People still buy people first and it is highly unlikely that someone will assign a large, high-cost project to someone on the basis of their profile on a platform alone.

There are good reasons to expect that a similar effect will be found on event industry platforms. Sure, there will be some work that gets passed via platforms but the biggest projects will likely be won, not because of a shiny profile on a platform but because of trusting relationships, built up meeting after meeting.

So yes, event platforms work. But they are not disruptors. In-person contact and relationship building will still rule the day for a long time to come.

Interpreting is Expensive … But the Alternatives Cost More

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: August 8, 2017

It’s always a surprise when event managers receive the response to their Request for a Quote for interpreting at an event. Even the simplest simultaneous interpreting setup seems to cost thousands of pounds. Is it really worth it?

 

There is no getting away from the fact that interpreting is expensive. And while the traditional justification has been to write long posts on how hard interpreting is (and it is hard) or to talk about the training interpreters have to take to be able to deliver at a high level (lots), that doesn’t mean a lot to you. No matter how good interpreting is, if it has no value for your company, it won’t be worth it.

 

One common response to the cost of interpreting is simply to decide to do everything in English. In some cases, that might seem like a very good short-term decision, especially as English is a global language. But what works in the short-term is often ruinous in the longer-term. Statistics from the House of Lords showed that companies in the UK lose out on £50 billion worth of contracts each year due to a lack of language skills.

 

English-only meetings and events might be cheap to set up but by displaying a lack of cultural awareness and language abilities, you will be putting customers off rather than winning them over. Conversely, when potential customers see that you care enough to have professional communications in their first language, they are more likely to see you as trustworthy and be more comfortable parting with their cash.

 

Choosing to do business in only one language leads to inevitable communication struggles. Every conference interpreter can tell stories of speakers who really should have used the interpreters that were available. For me, one of the most striking stories happened at a specialist construction event. Two Italian businesses had the opportunity to showcase their work. The first team presented in broken English, even though there were Italian to English interpreters available. The team from the second company noticed the train wreck that ensued and decided to speak in their best, most powerful Italian, which was then interpreted into English and then into French, Dutch and Spanish.

 

The difference was most noticeable after the break, just by looking at the number of visitors to the booths rented by each of the two companies. The first team, who used broken English, found themselves alone and bored while their competitors, who realised the power of interpreting, found themselves swamped with interest.

 

If there is a single best advertisement for the ROI of interpreting, it came last year, when I was interpreting for a British technical manufacturer, hoping to woo a French buyer into placing a large order. The entire meeting and the entire contract turned on a misunderstanding of a single word. The only person who realised what was going on and was able explain the problem to speakers of both languages? The interpreter.

 

One interpreter, one troublesome word, one large contract gained by the end of the two days. That was definitely money well spent. Interpreters, if recruited correctly, briefed properly and provided with the right setup will always be worth far more than you will pay them. Their work is the difference between an international meeting that changes the future of your company for the better and one that turns into a frustrating waste of time. Choose wisely.

 

And if you would like someone to help you choose interpreting that will deliver great value for money at your events, drop me an email.

5 Tips to Rock Your First International Event

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: July 3, 2017

Running international events is not easy, especially when you are new to the job. So, as someone who is often brought in as an interpreter to help make sure that the French-speaking audience love it as much as their English-speaking counterparts, here are my top 5 tips from the booth to you.

 

  1. Details matter

 

Yes, we all love nice rooms and a posh-looking programme but it is easy to spend so much time on the big things that the small but crucial details get left out. Little things, like the amount of water available, making sure everyone knows where the toilets are, keeping to time and having on-site staff who are competent and happy, make a huge difference. Just ask the people bursting for the loo while dealing with grumpy staff and they will tell you!

 

  1. Over-communicate

 

The post on keeping short lines of communication with suppliers is still one of the most popular on this blog. And it bears repeating. Given that every single international event will be a team effort, every member of the team needs to know what is going on and their part in it. What might seem like an irrelevant piece of information for you (the doors are opening fifteen minutes later than planned, two speeches are being swapped, an additional guest is coming) can make a big difference to any suppliers who are there. Better to give too much info than not enough.

 

  1. Treat Questions as Your Best Friend

 

In the same vein, while you will undoubtedly be busy in the run-up to the event, when someone in your team asks you a question, it is always worth treating it like a golden nugget, rather than an annoyance. Not only does answering their questions help them do their job more effectively but it can also save you precious time and money too. Queries such as “what are the goals of this event?”, “when can we get access to the room?”, and “what equipment will be onsite?” are absolutely fundamental to delivering a great event.

 

  1. Prioritise Purchases that Make a Difference

 

Ah budget constraints, the bane of many events! While it is absolutely true that every event has to be financially viable, it will always be worth asking about the consequences of different kinds of cost savings. Almost no one will notice it if you shell out on brand name water instead of standard stuff, if you put it all in clear bottles (is there actually any difference?) but they will notice if the PA system is rocky or if you have gone for cheap and unqualified interpreters and sub-standard conference interpreting equipment. A good rule-of-thumb is to prioritise purchases according to their importance in achieving the goals of your event. Few events really need the agenda printed out in gold-leaf anyway!

 

  1. Enjoy the ride!

 

Few event managers enter the profession for a quiet life! The thrill of seeing it all come together is a vital part of the job. And savouring that thrill is both a privilege and a necessity. No matter what happens, enjoy the fact that you did something that few people can do well: you brought together a team of experts to ensure that visitors from more than one country had an experience that made a difference to them. That’s worth celebrating.

 

If you are organising your first international event, you will need interpreting suppliers you can rely on. If you would like someone to save you time by making sure you get the right team every time, drop me an email. And here is a completely free template for briefing your interpreters too.

The Ultimate Interpreter Brief

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: June 12, 2017

If you organise or manage international events, this is for you.

To celebrate The Meetings Show 2017, I am pleased to offer the Ultimate Interpreter Brief, an absolutely free template, with no catches. It is entirely white label for you to add your company logo to and covers all the details needed by interpreters, agencies and consultant interpreters. On a single A4 Microsoft Word form, it holds the kind of information that would normally take days to finalise.

And it is yours for free.

But I can go even better than that.

I know that not all event managers and organisers are used to working with interpreters, so I have provided a completely free 10 minute tutorial on how to use the Ultimate Interpreter Brief, including some useful hints on best practice. And that is yours for free too!

If you would like any further information or to book me to provide interpreters for an upcoming event, click on this link.

Here are the links you will need.
The Ultimate Interpreter Brief template is here.

And this is the youtube tutorial:

Why I Only Offer On-site Interpreting

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: 

It is a trend that is both incredibly promising and incredibly controversial. Remote interpreting, where the interpreter can be located absolutely anywhere and yet still interpret for your event via a phone call or online platform, has become big business and is set to grow even more. So why would any consultant interpreter not jump at the opportunities it offers?

 

Don’t get me wrong. I can see the benefits of remote interpreting. With the growth in virtual meetings and the never-ending need for interpreters in dangerous situations, remote interpreting will enable business and save lives. I really do welcome its growth. But it also represents a trend that I have strategically chosen not to follow.

 

In modern, high-tech remote interpreting, interpreting is sold as a service that clients can dial into any time, with no particular commitment. That is great for some clients who might only ever need an interpreter for one conversation or who might want a bit of linguistic assistance here and there. It is not so good for those of us who are pushing for interpreting to be seen as a partnership.

 

In my own research and practice, I have seen how powerful it can be when speakers, interpreters, audience members and event organisers work together closely. While instant, remote interpreting is good, I have seen even better, longer-lasting results from being in the room, reading the situation closely and understanding the needs, wants and motivations of all those involved – the kind of involvement that is impossible when you aren’t physically there.

 

While in the past, having interpreting at a meeting was a marker of prestige, we are now fast arriving at a fundamental division in the profession. On one side, there will be interpreting as a service: slotting in seamlessly where needed and available at a touch of a button without any commitment. On the other side, there will be interpreting as partnership: delivering not just accurate interpreting but interpreting that is keyed to each particular context, audience and goal. In the former, interpreting will be incidental, there because of a transient need. In the latter, interpreting will be there not just because of a need but to provide real, lasting, ongoing value.

 

I have decided that the core purpose of my business is to be the person clients can trust to bring together teams of experts who are as committed to the success of their events as they are. From where I sit, that simply isn’t possible with any kind of interpreting delivery platform, with their automated sorting and emphasis on speedy choice.

 

I sincerely wish the developers of remote interpreting every success but I won’t be joining them.

 

If your business could do with someone to build you an interpreting dream team that you can work with again and again, it’s time we talked. Drop me an email for a free, no obligation chat.

Pre-trade show tips to make your day more interesting

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: June 7, 2017

Next week, I will have the honour of attending The Meetings Show. This will be my third year there and, suffice to say, I am far more prepared than ever before. Here are my top 6 tips for getting the most out of any show as a supplier who isn’t yet in the position to have a stand.

  1. Approach the show as a networking and market intelligence feast

The first time I went to the show, I must admit, I was a bit disappointed. I gained zero guaranteed new clients, had to face my own fears continually and felt overwhelmed.

I made two main mistakes. The first was expecting cash results straightaway. That rarely happens. What does happen is that you meet lots of new people and gain contacts that you just would not have found on your own.

The second mistake was only staying on the show floor and completely skipping the seminar program. If you want to know what is really going on in an industry, pay close attention to what is being taught, by whom and why. That little bit of info will tell you a lot about growing sectors and looming challenges. If you can position yourself as someone who can help clients rise to those challenges, you will be in a very good position.

  1. Do something random

Last year, the hardest moment was a rather annoying discussion on Brexit where the pro-Brexiteers basically talked down their opposition.  That one discussion was what I thought was going to be the best moment. It wasn’t by a long shot. Instead, the best moment happened when I was looking for a scheduled seminar and bumped into the head of an association. That one conversation wiped away the memory of the horrible discussion and helped me to see a new direction for my business.

The same can be said about visiting stands where you don’t have an agenda. Some of my most surprising wins last year came when I went up to stands on a whim, got talking and realised that I could provide some excellent content for some magazines for PAs. Two articles in those magazines later and I landed a spot in Flybe’s Flight Time in-flight magazine. One random idea, lots of real benefits.

Oh and some of the stands had great sweeties too!

  1. Stay for a while

It surprised me how many people seemed to walk in, saunter round and then leave quickly. You really can’t enjoy a show properly until you have explored every nook and cranny and hung around aimlessly for a bit. It’s those moments when you seem lost that can lead to the best outcomes.

  1. Get a show guide

Yes, they can be tricky to spot but the show floor plan and seminar guide will be your best friend. I like to mark all the stands I definitely want to visit, along with routes to the toilets and food areas. Sometimes, I will also mark down anyone I missed whom I want to contact. You would be surprised how useful those little books can be.

  1. Bring a backpack

While the show bags are pretty tough, you will need something special to carry all the magazines, materials and giveaways you get. Having a good, neat backpack also allows you to carry your own water and a bit of extra food, as well as reading material for the journey each way.

  1. Chill out

You would be surprised at how hard I had to work at my first trade show to get over my own nervousness. I took it all way too seriously, as if I was going to ruin my career if I didn’t manage to chat to that one person from Wedgewood DMC (still looking for another chat with them, actually). Nowadays, I have learned to take the show as a welcome day out of my schedule and to be as naturally me as I can be. It’s surprising how much better that works!

Building Credibility in a New Market

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: June 6, 2017

Whatever kind of business you run, there will come a time when you need to take your credibility and expertise and apply them to a completely new market. How can you do that and what does it take?

I had been an interpreter for about five years before I realised the power of credibility. I had based my entire marketing strategy on the premise that if I contacted enough potential clients (almost all of them agencies), I would eventually get work. And that kind of worked. Except the flow of work was slow and the process was boring.

At some point, I had the idea that I might be able to apply the work I had been doing on research and on blogging research to my own business. So, I put together a very basic wordpress site and started writing there and then shortly after, I started writing articles for magazines in my industry too.

Slowly and after a few false starts, I started to build a reputation. At the first professional conference I attended abroad, someone said they recognised me from my blog. My CV got shunted to the top of the pile by a very busy agency because one of their project managers had seen me on twitter.

The effort of creating content began to be rewarded with the benefit of being invited to speak at conferences and universities across the UK and Europe and, of course, the publication of my first book. Add to that the opportunity to do work for some new clients and I could show that I was marketing something I could actually deliver.

About eighteen months ago, I realised it was time to start the process all over again. As much as it is still fun to be recognised at conferences in my own industry, that wasn’t sufficient to help me reach the event management clients I am looking for. To do that, I was going to have to build up a reputation in their industry too!

If you are looking at doing something similar for your potential clients, there are a few stages that you will go through.

In the early days, you will have a regular fight with imposter syndrome (who am I to talk to these people?), which won’t be helped by the pile of rejections that you will get.

But that’s okay. Rejections are part of the process. Keep pitching to conferences and magazines. Keep writing content. Keep reading the magazines your clients read. Eventually, something will work. Deliver with excellence and you can go to the next stage.

If you are smart, you will leverage any success you get for all its worth. Did you get an article in a client magazine? Mention it on your website and in every single proposal. Did you get invited to do a talk? Invite potential clients to come. Did you deliver an excellent project? Use that experience to get more.

Whatever level of success you attain, it will only grow if you make the most out of it. What you learn from one experience becomes the food for the next and the audience you meet today can often help you build one tomorrow.

One last point, in all of this, it is important to be able to give some worthwhile knowledge or expertise in the process and it is vital to always deliver even better than you promise. When I chat with event managers, I don’t try to tell them how to run events, but I do try to give away some useful ideas about working more effectively with interpreters or bringing translation and interpreting together at their events. True expertise is not the knowledge that you are great but the ability to help others achieve greatness.

Keep pushing doors and adding value. It’s the best thing you can do for your business.

And, if you are an event manager looking for someone to build teams to deliver high-impact multilingual events, let’s chat.

The Importance of Small Wins

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: May 29, 2017

How can you keep your morale high no matter what economic waters your business finds itself sailing in? How can you demonstrate your growth and expertise to potential clients without talking about the same assignments and achievements over and over again or worse, sounding like an arrogant blowhard?

 

The answer is simple.

 

In a word full of Instagram moments and paid ads, make sure you let yourself celebrate small wins.

 

Here’s a straightforward example. As you might have read, I have started getting articles placed in the magazines read by my clients, which is itself part of a wider marketing strategy. Now, I could get all upset that so far, this has only landed me one new client and one project or I could get really excited that it has already landed me one new client and one project.

 

More to the point, before I even got to writing for Flybe’s inflight magazine, I got some wins in places like Executive Secretary magazine, the blog of Conference News and on the Eventopedia website (three times). Again, with each article, I could have decided to focus on the big goal I wanted to hit or I could decide to make the most of the small win I already had and do an incredible job at that level.

 

Small wins are a vital part of doing business. Almost no one goes straight from graduation to being a superstar entrepreneur or a successful interpreter or event manager. That might sound discouraging … unless you realise that your route from where you are to the destination you want to reach will go through lots of small wins.

 

There are still some clients that I want to add to my portfolio but the truth is that the route to landing them will include celebrating and making the most of the small wins – the projects of various sizes for various clients that I get this week.

 

Your twitter and LinkedIn feeds are most likely filled to the brim with people doing big important things with big important people. If you can’t find ways to celebrate the project on your plate right now, you might find yourself battling with self-doubt and on the verge of giving up.

 

So here’s a solution I would like you to try. I am going to push this post as far and wide as I can and I want you to do the same. But with a twist. Each time you send this article to someone or post it on any social media platform, I want you to find one small win you can celebrate and tag it with #mysmallwin. Even better, make sure you celebrate with someone else too.

 

So what’s your small win? What little thing is going right today? What interesting project is on your desk right now? Have you had a response from a client you have been chasing? Share your small win with others and see how those small wins add up to big changes.