Integrity Languages


The Day I Made Some Founders Sad

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: March 15, 2018

It all started so well. Two super nice and super enthusiastic founders asked if they could Skype call me to get my opinion on their latest project. As someone who has been known to gripe about people starting companies in the interpreting world without actually having a clue, I was pleasantly surprised and was happy to arrange a time to suit. And then, it all changed.


We got the idea from travelling around the world together.

We went to lots of countries where we didn’t know the language and thought “hey, what if you could instantly get an interpreter on your phone at the touch of a button? Then you could chat to literally anyone and get medicine and find directions and lots of stuff like that.”

So, our idea, and you might need to take a minute to take it in, is to build an app where people can get right to an interpreter in any language. It’ll be amazing for travellers and would help interpreters as we are sure there would be lots of work for them. (Cue winning smile). So, what do you think, as an industry expert?


Those who know interpreting would have seen hundreds of similar ideas. Very few have any real profile left. In the next twenty minutes or so, I would explain to those nodding start-up founders how the interpreting market works and the reason why so many companies trying to do the same thing have failed.


Here it is in a nutshell:

  • The interpreters who are offering excellent interpreting are becoming good businesspeople in their own right. Knowing the true value of their skills has led to them wanting more control over their work. This desire is pushing them to build their own client list consisting of good direct clients and/or established agencies who know the industry well and know how to work with interpreters.
  • This change is prompting a trickle-down effect, where younger and less confident interpreters are beginning to follow the same logic. This is leading in many places to a shortage of qualified/certified/experienced interpreters who are willing and interested in joining platforms for bulk selling their work.
  • There are still many people who are interested in such platforms but they will tend not to have any credentials or serious training. They might be good; they might be poor. The likelihood is that they have never been tested so you can’t know either way.
  • Machine interpreting is almost good enough to take away the need for human interpreters to do the phrasebook “is this the train for Salzburg?” “I have a sore throat” stuff anyway. Basically, if the phrase used to be in those small books you would buy from the airport newsagents before your flight, Google Translate has it sorted.
  • Put this together and you have a perfect storm of massive supply issues and dwindling demand for “on-demand instant human interpreting” for the needs of your typical tourist.


By about three-quarters of the way through the call, the smiles had become noticeably more fixed. I really did like these founders. They asked intelligent questions and seemed truly interested in what I had to say.


I just wish that they hadn’t chosen the world’s most oversaturated idea for their big business.


Before you think that this post is about arrogant self-congratulation, it actually made me realise my own business frailties. At the beginning of my career, I had my sights set on one market and one market alone. I realised that I might not crack it right away so in the meantime, I sold my service through precisely the kind of bulk selling platforms that most green founders think will work for interpreting by app.


It’s hard to learn that your marketing and entire business model is flawed. It’s even harder to pick up the pieces and start again. For me, it took a burnout episode and a PhD for the clouds to break. Even now, I am still finessing how I work and how I market.


The real lesson of this story is not that start-up founders in interpreting are likely to fail badly unless they ask interpreters first. It isn’t even that the days of finding excellent interpreters on bulk selling platforms of one kind or another are ending. It’s that we all need help and honest feedback, even though it might make us sad. Being sad today is much more beneficial than losing your house tomorrow.

What Does a Consultant Interpreter Actually Do?

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: March 14, 2018

For most businesses who don’t have an HQ in Brussels, Paris or some other city where conference interpreting is ubiquitous, the phrase “consultant interpreter” will seem entirely foreign. So what is one and what can they do for you?

To answer that question, we need to think about how interpreters are traditionally hired. For many companies, hiring an interpreter means sending an email to an interpreting agency with a brief for the event, sending over documents and then waiting for the interpreters to turn up on the day.

There is not a lot obviously wrong with that model and, as I mention in my free Buying Interpreting Step-by-Step course, there are times when going to an interpreting agency is exactly what you need to do.

Yet, there comes a time in many businesses where running international events becomes a regular feature of your work. There might also be occasions where the event is so special or so valuable that you want greater partnership than the traditional agency model can easily provide.

This is where consultant interpreters come in. As both a practising interpreter in their own right and someone who knows how to build specialist interpreting teams, they know how to match your exact needs with interpreters on the market. They will know who is excellent for sales events and who is better in board meetings. Why? Because they will tend to have worked alongside the people they recommend and will have first-hand experience of their strengths and weaknesses.

As well as building you a custom interpreting team, a good consultant interpreter will also have relationships with suppliers of interpreting equipment. That relationship alone could save you hours of frustration!

Lastly, here’s something that few people know. Consultant interpreters really are consultants too. If you have a question about the best order to speeches to keep people awake or the right interpreting equipment or even the best way to address guests from different countries, ask your consultant interpreter. They will have the knowledge and experience to either answer those questions themselves or find you the right person to answer them.


Now that you have seen what a consultant interpreter can do, isn’t it time you chatted with one? Drop me an email using the contact form for a free Skype chat to see how working with a consultant interpreter could super-charge your business.

Should suppliers pay to speak at tradeshows?

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: February 26, 2018

In the past year I have been invited to speak at two different, but equally prestigious tradeshows. Both attract an audience of my ideal clients and both are free to attend. But my invite to speak came with a catch, the organisers would love to have me speak … if I were only to purchase a stand at the event.

Now, let’s put this in context. As one lovely salesperson at one of those events made clear to me, the “buy a stand to speak” rule mostly applies to suppliers, especially “niche” ones. If you are a buyer or have already made your name, the floor is yours. If your business is in making buyers’ lives more comfortable and more successful, come with cash in hand, please.

Honestly, it is understandable. The truth is that suppliers go to tradeshows with selling in mind and the Return on Investment at any of these shows should easily outstrip the initial investment. Notice the “should“.

There are never any guarantees. Personally, I have seen some sessions at tradeshows where the speaker has obviously done everything they could to attract an audience (and probably paid a big chunk of their annual marketing budget for a stand) only to end up speaking to about three people, one of whom thought this was another session and only stayed because they were British.

And of course, if you are a smaller supplier, the likelihood is that your time in the limelight (if speaking to three people and a few moths can be seen as the limelight) means that noone is there on your stand. What you gain on the possibility of landing new business through speaking, you are losing in opportunity cost.

While I understand the underlying mathematics and logic of linking buying a stand with speaking, the speaker and buyer in me is growing sceptical. As a speaker, I know for sure that a need to sell will kill any talk and, if you have paid significant sums to speak, it will be tough to erase the need to sell from your presentation. Few speakers manage it and so encouraging a “buy a stand to do a talk” model is probably not in the interests of any tradeshow audience, who are there to learn, not to get the hard sell.

As a buyer (and yes I have looked to buy from companies I have met a tradeshows), I really want to see education and selling treated separately. Yes, buyer education is part of the sales process but I personally walk away from any presentation where the two get confused.

If you learn something from someone, you may wish to buy from them. But there is a difference between going to a talk to learn and meeting them with the intent to buy.

I am sure that there are lots of success stories of business people laying out the cash to speak at tradeshows and seeing success. But I have yet to read one on the website of any show. I am sure that there are cases of the pay-to-speak system opening paths for speakers who wouldn’t normally have even gotten near the stage at a big show. But again, I have yet to read one. And I wonder how many excellent speakers it is actively putting off.

Instead, I have read several speakers write rather bluntly and disparagingly about the practice. I have come across stories of people deciding not to attend a show at all when they found out that paying for a stand was a route to getting a speaking slot. I know of one show which saw less footfall last year and can’t help wonder if their “buy a stand to speak” policy had something to do with it.

As a trained researcher, I have to go with the data and at the moment, I haven’t seen any data that shows me that “buy a stand to speak” is in the interests of speakers, their audience or the bottom-line. I would love to see such data. But for now, if I am invited to speak, I will reflexively check if I have to buy a stand. And if I have to buy a stand, I will simply walk away, knowing that there are other, less financially onerous ways to get excellent content to potential clients, especially with excellent organisations, such as Hashtag Events, showing that the practice is anything but universal.

Lessons from Ten Years in Business

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: January 30, 2018

This month, I have the honour of celebrating 10 years in business. It has been a fun, frustrating, incredible, disappointing, worrying, and inspiring journey and so I thought it would be a great opportunity to pass on some of the big lessons I have learned.

  • The path less-taken is the one where the fun is.

This lesson could also be entitled “ignore the platforms” or “never take the first option.” You see, for my first three or so years in business, I followed the crowd in my industry and thought that I would concentrate my marketing on a small number of big, established platforms.

Of course, there is nothing intrinsically wrong with those platforms and I did win one or two long-term clients from there but it is no accident that, as I learned more about business and understood more about my potential clients, I weaned myself off using those platforms for marketing.

No matter how much traffic comes to fiverr or translatorscafe, the fact is that your image on those platforms is largely outside of your control. If they redesign the interface, you have no choice but to go along with it. If they prioritise members who buy super-amazing-annual-gold-star-plus membership, you will lose out if you don’t pay them money all the time.

Conversely, if you choose to get off your butt and try other ways of winning clients, while the results will take longer to come, they will eventually be better. In 2017, I found myself parting on good terms with the very last client I had who had come from platforms and celebrating amazing growth in my client list from other forms of marketing.

  • Get off your butt.

There is a very persistent myth that you can create a super-rich business without leaving your house, purely on social media and online bidding.

While social media is now a vital part of my own marketing, it took me too long to learn that very few clients will pay excellent money to someone they only know from a twitter thread about Boris Johnson’s hair.

The longer I am in business, the more vital it becomes to leave the house: going to tradeshows, networking, meeting decision-makers, doing in-person CPD and even more besides. The stronger the relationship you have with someone, the more of their hard-earned cash they will be willing to spend.

It’s no surprise that my social media strategist and all of my closest business advisors are people I know from in-person events.

  • Leave the echo chamber

Yes, it’s always nice to spend time online and offline with colleagues and yes, referrals are important but all business-people need to spend as much time in the world of their potential clients as they do with people who share their opinions, loves, and obsession with the Oxford comma.

One of the biggest trends I am seeing in my own profession is that the good professionals are becoming less tolerant of online whinging and are instead promoting the view that we should be trying to learn more about our clients. That is a very good thing. The more we learn about our clients, the more we can help them achieve what they want to achieve.

  • Not everyone needs to love you

The corollary to the point above is that it is too easy to get wrapped-up in “reputation management” and “engagement” and try to be all things to all people. Oddly, it was only when I tried to target a niche and actually have opinions that my business really got off the ground. For as long as I was using the same, safe terminology and tactics and saying the same things as everyone else, getting sales was like pulling teeth.

Obviously, you shouldn’t act like a moron or spout derogatory remarks. But you should do your homework and have some kind of opinion. Have something interesting to say and back it up with the way you deliver your services.

Some people won’t like what you do. Some people won’t get it. Some people will tell you to pack in your dreams and get a “proper job”. As long as you are being sensible and not trying to launch a business selling rain to Scotland or selling tulips to Dutch people, and as long as you are willing to learn and adjust, you will be fine.

  •  Never stop learning

I can truly say that I have learned more in the year and a half since I graduated with my PhD than I did during it.

Doing a PhD is incredible but, as much as anything else, you learn how to be critical, generate and analyse data, think and express yourself. Take those skills into the business world and suddenly you have the keys to learn incredibly practical subjects such as business development, market segmentation, funnel creation and networking.

Wherever you are in your career, never stop learning from people in your field and people who can’t even spell your job title! Often you will learn more from “outsiders” than you will from experts in your own area.


All these things might sound very general … and they are. Yes, I have learned all sorts of technical and business skills in the past ten years and I still shake my head at the naivety I had at the start. But I wouldn’t have managed to learn all those skills without learning the lessons of taking a different path, getting off my butt to leave the echo chamber, understanding that I don’t need to please everyone and always learning more.

For now, I am excited to see what the next ten years will bring!


5 Big Questions to Ask Your Interpreting Agency

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: January 17, 2018

If you are buying interpreting, you will spend significant amount of cash on a service that can go wonderfully right … or dreadfully wrong. How can you tell in advance that things will work the way you need them too? While you can’t guarantee that the event will go perfectly, you can ask key questions that can give you a strong indication of what is likely to happen, especially if you are working with an interpreting agency.

As a consultant interpreter and freelance interpreter working for both direct clients and agencies, I thought it was time to give you five key questions that you can use to ensure that you get the best deal possible from your interpreting agency. Here they are:

  1. When will I know the names of the interpreters you have picked?

A bad interpreting agency will do its best to obfuscate any details of the interpreting team. While giving you direct contact with the team might be justified by saying something about secrecy (whose exactly?) or competition, you should seriously consider asking for the names of the interpreters and the city they are based in. Why?

With the names and cities of the interpreters in hand, you can spend five minutes looking them up to check that they have all the qualifications and experience that the agencies say they have. If the agency aren’t going to tell you the team until they arrive at the venue, you have to ask questions about their hiring process and the criteria they are using.

Another reason for knowing the team in advance is that you may need to book hotel rooms for them or check for dietary requirements. While some might argue that you should trust the agency to send you a good team, they really have nothing to hide and you have everything to gain by knowing the team in advance.

  1. What criteria do you use to select interpreters?

The answer to this should be really simple: experience (including their previous working relationship and feedback from clients), referrals from their trusted team of existing interpreters, association membership, qualifications, and availability are the big five.

The reality is that good agencies will default to something like those five. For a bad interpreting agency, it will all come down to who is the cheapest and who they can drag out of bed. In interpreting, cheapest is rarely, if ever, best.

  1. Are you a member of a trade association?

You can safely ignore any wooly reply that includes the letters “ISO”. What you are looking for is membership of a trade body in the languages services industry with a solid set of codes of conduct, not proof that the agency have consistent procedures is. Having great procedures means nothing if the team they send is rubbish!

ITI and ATC are the associations to watch for in the UK; ATA are the go-to in the US and there are similar bodies all over the world. Most countries will have some kind of association that allows interpreting agencies to be members. Don’t be shy about cross-checking their claims with the association itself. All of the big ones have online directories that allow you to check who their members are.

  1. Could you send me the link to your ProZ BlueBoard entry?

This is often country-dependent but many, if not most reputable interpreting agencies will be listed on the Blue Board. This lists what freelancers think of that particular company. A score of 5 indicates that freelancers are happy with them. If they score below 3 or their profile has been disabled or blocked, run away.

Why should you worry about what interpreters think of the agency you have chosen? Agencies with a good reputation tend attract excellent interpreters, who produce great results for you. Agencies with a bad reputation end up with the kinds of “interpreters” who might appear on TV as “fake interpreters”.

It is also worth looking for them on websites that discuss their payment practices and even ones that gather views from former employees. The more you know about the kind of company you are dealing with, the better. Companies with a bad payment history will usually deliver poor results.

  1. Can we arrange a quick Skype chat?

This might seem like an oddball but, in an age where there is a need for a website dedicated to listing people trying to scam, it is important that interpreting buyers take a similar precaution. One simple skype call to check that the agency is who they say they are and to gauge their level of helpfulness and accessibility can mean the difference between a great event and being caught in a scam.

The Million Pound Reason You Should Still Choose Human Interpreters

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: January 3, 2018

Imagine the scene:


It has been a long negotiation. The British company are keen to widen their client base and have managed to secure a meeting with an unbelievably big French buyer. The French buyer wants to secure a more robust supply chain and he knows that this company will deliver.


Both companies want a good result. Right now you wouldn’t know that.


Right now, they are locked in a corridor-stomping, wall-pointing, chart-explaining disagreement. And it’s not even over something complex. They have already sorted out packaging and delivery, size and spec. But right now they are arguing over quality statistics.


And right now, you are about to witness the turning point of the whole meeting, One interpreter, one word, one sudden realisation of what the real issue is.


“The interpreter believes there has been a misunderstanding.”


Those weren’t the exact words I used but the meaning is the same. Within less than five minutes, the disagreement was resolved (you will have to wait for my next book to read exactly how). Within less than two hours, clearance was given for a test order, which would be the last hurdle between the British company and a contract worth several million pounds.


The truth is, the success of most meetings depends on more than accurate interpreting. For meetings to work, you need interpreters who are sensitive to context, able to spot and resolve cultural miscues and shifts in nuance and professionals who are brave enough to make intelligent decisions.


One day, we might have apps that can deliver perfectly accurate interpreting. Between some languages and in some subjects, machine translation is already delivering acceptable results for written texts using controlled language. But what stands between you and the sale is rarely “accurate interpreting.” What you need to succeed is excellent interpreting.


And, for the foreseeable future you will need humans for that.


If your company is heading for a conference or meeting that just has to be right, I can build you an interpreting team that delivers when it matters most. Drop me an email to set up a free, no obligation skype meeting.

Why Social Science and Not Technology will Determine Your Company’s Future

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: December 18, 2017

Another day, another new technology grabbing the limelight. This year alone, we have seen Machine Learning, Neural Networks, Blockchain and Cryptocurrencies each vie for centre stage. And now, with the new fashion for AI specialists predicting when certain jobs will be replaced by robots (and always predicting that they will be last!), it looks as if all we need to do is strap ourselves to technology and let it pull us to a wonderful future. But is tech really all it takes for success?


In the face of AI, Machine Learning and the like, it helps to remember the plight of laserdisks, Betamax video recorders, minidiscs and jazz drives. All these represented technological advances. Each represented a step change in thinking and an improvement on the competition. All of them ended up on the junkyard of history, right next to PDAs and the portable CD player.


Whatever engineers might say, technology on its own is never enough to bring real change. Pity the poor company with a brand new product, only to see its competitors come out with a cheaper and less reliable version that has the face of a celebrity on the side of it. Few investors will plow cash into a concept that works wonderfully but requires large enterprises to convert wholesale from their existing legacy systems.


For technology to make a difference, it must be adopted. For it to be adopted, people must be convinced of its benefits. For people to be convinced, someone in the company selling the product has to have a good grasp of how people think and how they behave in groups.


Behold the power of social science. Like fine chocolate, social science comes in many flavours: from the heady delights of statistical demographics to the tempting subtlety of autoethnography. What all of social science shares in common is a commitment to study and understand people.


Historically, the biggest war within social science was the split between those who preferred quantitative studies with large data sets and complex statistics and those who preferred qualitative studies, which look more at individual and small group experience. Apart from a few dusty corners, that war is now over and the winner is: both sides. Yes, most social scientists will now tell you that, if you want to understand people you need both the big statistical data and the small group/individual perspective.


There is a lesson there for technology geeks, especially those fascinated by the power of Big Data. Statistics and data are powerful but personal experience and subjective ideas matter too. If your business is going to thrive, you will have to do more than harness big data; you will need to know how to persuade, encourage, serve and delight people.


It’s no wonder then that the highest converting marketing media are still face-to-face contact and word-of-mouth recommendations. Even with the rise of social media, we humans still love to look people in the eyes and spend time with them before we hand over our hard-earned cash. An in-person recommendation from a trusted friend will always carry more weight than a targeted Facebook advert.


The reality is that few new technological products live up to the utopian marketing created by their inventors. Those translation earbuds that function perfectly on that YouTube video will struggle in a crowded bar or when you can no longer be bothered to speak in a mechanical monotone and there are no producers around to ensure everyone behaves predictably. That shiny new tablet will run at breakneck speed … until you actually load your favourite apps onto it.


Technology is wonderful and, if used well, it can make real contributions to productivity and profit margins. But for those gains to be realised, you need social skills like leadership, trustworthiness and persuasion. For your business to succeed, you will need a social scientist’s head for understanding people and their predilections much more than you will need an engineer’s eye for a new piece of kit that could possibly be created.


By all means enjoy technology but put knowing and serving people first and you won’t go far wrong.




The Two Questions Everyone Forgets to Ask About Interpreting Assignments

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: November 24, 2017

If you have worked with professional interpreters you will know two things:

  1. Interpreting is not cheap.
  2. You really need them to interpret well.

The first of those two issues is the one that clients think about most. It is easy to start thinking ahead to their invoices and see if there is a way that you can reduce costs. And you can indeed reduce interpreting costs if you want to.

You might rely on “Bilingual Bob” (or Bobbie) who works in accounting and speaks decent French. You might download one of those phone apps and hope it works and that your visitors don’t mind sharing a single pair of wireless headphones.

Or you might see if you can find a cheaper interpreter somewhere. Maybe the equipment guys might get you a package deal or something.

But, as important as cash is, it’s the second of those two realisations above that you really need to think about. Few clients ever think about the risks and rewards involved in interpreting when they book interpreters. It all comes down to two basic questions:

  1. If this all goes wrong, how much will it cost you?
  2. If this all goes perfectly, how much will it make you?

When you are looking at interpreting quotes, those are the questions you need to think about most. The first question tells you the risks involved in the assignment. In this month alone, I have done one assignment where poor quality interpreting could have led to poor safety practices being implemented in factories across Europe and another where poor interpreting could have lost a deal worth tens of millions of Euros.

On the flip side, the second question tells you about the rewards of good interpreting. I did one job this time last year where two days of interpreting led to a multi-year, multi-million pound contract and one this year where excellent interpreting allowed different subsidiaries of the same company to share their best environmental practices.

There are always risks and rewards involved in interpreting. The question is, how much are you prepared to pay to mitigate the risks and increase the chances of the rewards?

What Makes an Event International?

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: October 26, 2017

International events are all the rage again. It seems that, if you want to attract savvy visitors, just being “national” won’t cut it. No matter how niche your event and how backwater your venue, if you slap “international” in the name, you will get immediate kudos and an uptick in visitors.


But what actually is an international event?


At its most basic, we could argue that as soon as someone from another country attends your event, it has instantly become international. But that is obviously silly. With air travel still relatively cheap and most European borders still open, having an “international guest” could simply mean that Joe Bloggs popped over on the ferry from Calais to come to your show because he had nothing better to do. Hardly something worth boasting about.


Well, maybe international means that a company or organisation from another country has come to visit. That’s better but still misses the point.


Having a sponsor from Belgium or a group coming from Japan isn’t really the same as the event itself being international. If your content, presentation and décor looks exactly like it did in the days when you were the “West Kilbride Fair for [whatever]” then the presence of a handful of international guests hasn’t really made a difference. In fact, they are pretty likely to go home wishing they never bought their air tickets in the first place!


What makes international events distinctive?


A truly international event is distinctive not so much in terms of the presence of some people from outside your country but in terms of the outlook of the event itself. It’s one thing to manage to persuade ten people from Spain to pop across for two days; it’s quite another to have a show that has a lasting impact on your visitors, no matter where they came from.


To do that takes much more than hanging the odd welcome sign in a different language or giving a passing acknowledgement that someone came to your event from outside the M25. International events that really work do two things right.


International Events Celebrate Cultural Diversity


Why does the Frankfurt Book Fair draw crowds year after year? Why do small, targeted European association events often produce better results than hulking faceless shows?


In both cases, cultural diversity is not just acknowledged; it is celebrated.  In our data-rich societies, answers to information questions are always at our fingertips. The strength of in-person events is in experience, not just information! And for people from a variety of cultures to have a great experiences, their unique contribution must be honoured and celebrated.


The very best international events encourage speakers and delegates to express their own cultural perspective and engage with those of others. Rather than slamming down a requirement to dress the same, speak English and sound like you just popped over on the tube, international events that make a difference create a space for people to experience different cultures and learn from them, which leads to the next key.


International Events Promote Linguistic Diversity


Don’t tell me you didn’t see this coming. Yes, it is pretty obvious. There really is no point in claiming the title of an “international event” if the only language you want to see or hear is English. In doing that, you hand over the privilege, power and control to native English-speakers and those who can pass for them.


Yes, English is an international language but even the most skilled second-language English-speaker will express themselves best in their native language. And, since we now know that nearly 60% of them will rarely or never buy in anything but their native language (source: Common Sense Advisory), making content and talks available in several languages will create a sales and results boost too.


If you are still wondering whether it is really worth the effort to promote linguistic diversity at your next event, just ask yourself which is experience would be better for you: being at an event where everything is happening in a language you learned in High School or being at the same event but hearing and seeing your language there.


It’s obvious isn’t it.


The Takeaway


The point of all this is simple. Yes, “international events” are in vogue but getting them right takes more than the name itself. A great international event that has an impact needs the services of translators and conference interpreters. If you would like to know how to put together the right package for your next truly international event, drop me an email.

What Nelson Mandela can Teach Business Owners

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: September 27, 2017

“If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart.” 
― Nelson Mandela

One of the most inspiring figures in history, Nelson Mandela’s legacy is simply incredible. Everyone knows about his  work in fighting apartheid and leading South Africa. Yet, as inspiring as he is, one of his pithiest quotes is often forgotten.

In a world driven by information and communication, it is striking how many companies still have the attitude that everyone speaks English, so professional translation and interpreting are pointless. The bare facts show them to be wrong.

The All Party Parliamentary Group for languages has shown that, in the United Kingdom alone, companies miss out on £48 billion worth of contracts each year due to a lack of language skills. Research from Common Sense Advisory has found that 75% of consumers prefer to buy in their native language and nearly 60% of consumers will never or only rarely buy from English-only websites.

And, no, machine translation is not enough to bridge the gap. We only need to peruse the numerous examples of poor machine translation found around the web (supreme court beef, anyone?) to see why professionals are still needed. When it comes to interpreting, the results are even more striking, as can be seen from this video of a so-called “translation earpiece” in action.

Human professionals will always deliver a better job. Only last year, I helped a company land a seven figure contract by smoothing out a cultural misunderstanding during an interpreting assignment. Machines won’t do that. At best, they just tell you what the person said.

Interpreting makes a difference. You will always be more convincing when working with a professional than you will be without them. If you are looking for your business to reach international markets and persuade buyers who don’t speak your language, it’s time we talked. Drop me an email to see the difference professional interpreter can make to you.

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