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Monthly Archives: August 2017

Interpreters Climb Inside Your Head for a Living

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: August 30, 2017

Yesterday, I talked about why preparing for an interpreting assignment involves a whole lot more than just looking up terminology. Today, I want to take that a bit further. As I am realising with this job especially, interpreters have to do more than understand what you are saying, we need to get inside your head.

 

There is one particular speaker at this event. When I read his speech, I can understand him on one level. When I watch him on YouTube, I understand him better but I will learn the most about him by doing deeper research on his writing, his affiliations and the things he has done in his work. Nine times out of ten, the trickiest terminological and phraseological issues are resolved by context, not by dictionaries. If I want to understand what someone is saying, I need to understand what they are trying to do with what they are saying.

 

For a trained interpreter, that is well-trodden ground. Most of us will have heard of or have been trained in speech act theory – the idea that people do things with the words they say. But when you are interpreting, you need to go even further than that. To interpret someone well, you need to really get a hold of why they are saying what they are saying and who they are saying it too. Even more, you need to be able to figure out the best way to project that to a brand new audience – one they might never meet or talk to personally.

 

To allow yourself to be interpreted is to trust someone to produce a version of what you said in another language that means the same thing somehow. They become your voice and your door to an entirely new culture. As long as you are being interpreted, you live in two (or more!) languages and cultures at once.

 

At this conference, it is clear that speakers will be trying to convince and argue, persuade and prompt, debate and describe. For our interpreting to even come close to working, we will need to figure out ways to allow them to do that an entirely different language, with entirely different ways of convincing, arguing, persuading, prompting, debating and describing. And all that while having no control over the pace or technicality or even clarity of the words we hear. It’s hard work but it is always worth it.

Another Look Behind the Scenes of Conference Interpreting

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: August 29, 2017

The conference season has started again with a nice new conference landing on my plate. Better yet, I get to interpret at it alongside my favourite boothmate. I thought I would take the opportunity to give you another behind the scenes look at what it means to prepare for and deliver a conference interpreting job.

 

The first thing I need to talk about is preparation. While new interpreters might focus on terminology (and this job has lots!), the more I do this job, the more I realise that terminology is not the issue. Under all the words ending in –ism and hyphenated pairs are attempts to communicate something that matters.

 

The problem with concentrating too much on terminology is that it can get in the way of understanding the meaning. Yes, I did just say that!

 

For this conference, I am not just going to practice interpreting, gather terminology and the like; I am going to write short summaries of the arguments of every talk I am sent. It will take time but the practice of really getting to know someone’s argument, even memorising it, will help me no end in the booth. Besides, as every translator and interpreter knows, the meaning of any word is determined by its context.

 

The more you learn and understand about what a speaker is trying to do, and the better you learn to see through the parade of buzzwords, the better you can interpret. And it’s excellent interpreting, not just excellent terminological knowledge, that clients need and want.

How to Lose a Prospect in One Step

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: August 17, 2017

It’s really simple. In today’s always-on, super personalised society, as soon as you use automated messages you lose people’s interest. Sending mass emails, automated twitter DMs or even copying & pasting generic messages into LinkedIn or Facebook PMs will lose you leads and push people elsewhere.

It looks like a timesaver but it isn’t. It’s a lead killer.

It’s especially awful when you have just had a conversation with someone. Imagine having just discovered what someone could add to your business, looked at their services and planned an email to look at a purchase. Now imagine that just as you are about to look at buying they send you an obviously generic, mass-style message. Will that make you more likely or less likely to buy?

So why do it to your prospects?

Craft each communication. Tailor each email.

The only time generic works is when you are doing something generic. Selling is not generic. Neither is building up a relationship with a prospect. Until the moment when someone has volunteered to be part of a programme or process, they need to be treated as an individual.

And if you are reading this while setting up your twitter autoresponse or writing your mass LinkedIn message campaign, I do hope it will give you pause. If it doesn’t and you lose high potential leads, you will now know why.

Do event platforms work?

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: August 16, 2017

It seems that at least once a quarter, some new event sourcing platform will pop up. This blog has already discussed the possibilites and drawbacks of venue sourcing sites but, with more and more companies trying to be the next big directory of everything event managers need, perhaps it’s time to think about how things work from the other side. Are event platforms any good for suppliers? Do they actually get you work?

The answer to that question will, of course, depend on the platform and the supplier. However, there are good reasons to doubt that event platforms will create the market disruption they often claim.

To see why, let’s take a lesson from translation and interpreting. There, despite a parallel market trend to the events industry, with platforms springing up like weeds along a driveway, there are still one or two major players who dominate the scene. The biggest and best established, is ProZ.com, which has taken its size and age and turned them into advantages by launching revenue producing conferences, courses and virtual events.

Yet even a cursory glance of the discussion of the platform among industry insiders will reveal a very mixed picture. While it is entirely possible for someone to pick up clients there – and indeed many still do – much of the best work seems to come via individual direct contact.

In other words, the very best that a platform like that can do for a supplier is to function as a website. The problem with that is that it is a website that the supplier has little control over and which does not give them the kind of fine-grained data that most good website owners would use to improve their sales and marketing.

In addition, it is no secret that the jobs that come through platforms tend not to be at the very top of the price tree. Largely, the high value projects are still allocated based on personal contact and prior relationship. People still buy people first and it is highly unlikely that someone will assign a large, high-cost project to someone on the basis of their profile on a platform alone.

There are good reasons to expect that a similar effect will be found on event industry platforms. Sure, there will be some work that gets passed via platforms but the biggest projects will likely be won, not because of a shiny profile on a platform but because of trusting relationships, built up meeting after meeting.

So yes, event platforms work. But they are not disruptors. In-person contact and relationship building will still rule the day for a long time to come.

Interpreting is Expensive … But the Alternatives Cost More

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: August 8, 2017

It’s always a surprise when event managers receive the response to their Request for a Quote for interpreting at an event. Even the simplest simultaneous interpreting setup seems to cost thousands of pounds. Is it really worth it?

 

There is no getting away from the fact that interpreting is expensive. And while the traditional justification has been to write long posts on how hard interpreting is (and it is hard) or to talk about the training interpreters have to take to be able to deliver at a high level (lots), that doesn’t mean a lot to you. No matter how good interpreting is, if it has no value for your company, it won’t be worth it.

 

One common response to the cost of interpreting is simply to decide to do everything in English. In some cases, that might seem like a very good short-term decision, especially as English is a global language. But what works in the short-term is often ruinous in the longer-term. Statistics from the House of Lords showed that companies in the UK lose out on £50 billion worth of contracts each year due to a lack of language skills.

 

English-only meetings and events might be cheap to set up but by displaying a lack of cultural awareness and language abilities, you will be putting customers off rather than winning them over. Conversely, when potential customers see that you care enough to have professional communications in their first language, they are more likely to see you as trustworthy and be more comfortable parting with their cash.

 

Choosing to do business in only one language leads to inevitable communication struggles. Every conference interpreter can tell stories of speakers who really should have used the interpreters that were available. For me, one of the most striking stories happened at a specialist construction event. Two Italian businesses had the opportunity to showcase their work. The first team presented in broken English, even though there were Italian to English interpreters available. The team from the second company noticed the train wreck that ensued and decided to speak in their best, most powerful Italian, which was then interpreted into English and then into French, Dutch and Spanish.

 

The difference was most noticeable after the break, just by looking at the number of visitors to the booths rented by each of the two companies. The first team, who used broken English, found themselves alone and bored while their competitors, who realised the power of interpreting, found themselves swamped with interest.

 

If there is a single best advertisement for the ROI of interpreting, it came last year, when I was interpreting for a British technical manufacturer, hoping to woo a French buyer into placing a large order. The entire meeting and the entire contract turned on a misunderstanding of a single word. The only person who realised what was going on and was able explain the problem to speakers of both languages? The interpreter.

 

One interpreter, one troublesome word, one large contract gained by the end of the two days. That was definitely money well spent. Interpreters, if recruited correctly, briefed properly and provided with the right setup will always be worth far more than you will pay them. Their work is the difference between an international meeting that changes the future of your company for the better and one that turns into a frustrating waste of time. Choose wisely.

 

And if you would like someone to help you choose interpreting that will deliver great value for money at your events, drop me an email.

Here’s a Brand New Course to Improve Your Public Speaking

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: August 3, 2017

There is nothing that comes close to the impact of delivering a talk that wows an audience. There is no better way to make people take notice of your business, believe your results or give you a promotion. Yet public speaking is regularly listed among our worst fears. It’s time that ended.

 

For the past month, I have been working on a course covering the four basic building blocks of public speaking:

  • Content that carries the message you want to deliver
  • Communication that brings understanding and encourages change
  • Connection that makes you believable and relatable
  • Creativity that creates moments that people remember when they go home.

 

Those are the four building blocks that I have been teaching around Europe in my popular Public Speaking Workshop for the past two years. This has honed my presentation and allowed me to answer the big questions that people have about speaking. And now, I have gathered the very best content from that workshop and turned it into a four part course with videos, podcasts, FAQ sheets and a mini-guide for those who are new to speaking.

Until 9th August, 2017 the course is on offer at a bargain price of £29.99 for fifty minutes of video teaching, almost an hour of downloadable podcasts and all the other help sheets. Whatever your business, you will find that improving your public speaking gives you a noticeable boost and this course is there to do exactly that.

 

To find out more or to buy the course right now, simple go here: https://integrity-languages-courses.thinkific.com/courses/public-speaking-building-blocks