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Category Archives: Interpreting

Interpreters don’t need any more platforms

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: March 14, 2017

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At least twice a year, the world of interpreting is bombarded with another “solution provider” offering a game-changing idea that will revolutionise the industry… only to vanish in a puff of smoke. Why is the industry still dominated by the same few players? Why do the game-changers often turn out to be nothing more than a momentary distraction? 

The most common reason that new platforms make a big splash and then sink into obscurity is simply that, in many cases, the inventors either have little industry knowledge or try to solve a problem for which a good, but not perfect solution exists.

Take telephone interpreting. It would really take something special to knock the likes of Language Line off their perch, simply because the largest uses of that form of interpreting are markets where multi-year, exclusive supplier contracts rule the day. To win there, you need to be a technology provider, agency, quality manager and telecoms company all at once.

Then there is the rash of providers looking to provide human interpreting via an app, usually for ad hoc work. This is basically the telephone interpreting market but with less status and so recruiting interpreters means either paying professional rates to try to attract experts and running razor thin margins or going for “bilinguals” and sacrificing quality and hoping clients won’t notice.

It is pretty obvious then that “Interpreting via app” is not the cash cow that it looks like. Building another platform is a pretty risky way of trying to make money, especially since more and more interpreters are looking to win their own clients anyway.

Of course, there are a lot of new potential markets, such as webinar interpreting and remote interpreting for hospitals. However, in those cases, once again, just being a platform provider is not enough. Clients seem to want solution providers in those market to provide both the tech and the specialist interpreters to use it. And that is something you can only do if you already know the industry well.

So what should you try if you want to make money from the interpreting industry? By far the best course of action would be to tune into what the upper end of the market is doing, since the mid- and bulk-markets are already so competitive. Tech that improves interpreter workflows, such as automated term extraction, easier billing and payment management, slicker terminology apps and travel management will always be popular. There is also a need for specific CRM tools for the industry that link to client-specific term lists and ways of tracking practice. Add to that the need to service the needs of new tech-driven markets and there is enough space for a whole world of new providers.

There is huge potential for developers to create something of real value… just don’t make another over-hyped platform, OK?

4 Ways to Find Conference Interpreters for your Event

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: February 28, 2017

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Finding the right interpreter can be daunting. It doesn’t get much easier once you narrow things down from all interpreters to just conference interpreters either. But, thankfully, there are ways to simplify the process. Here are my top 4 tips.

 

  • Be really specific in what you are looking for.

 

Yes, it sounds obvious but it is actually incredibly frequent to see potential clients search for a “translator” when they need an “interpreter” or even look for “simultaneous translators” and wonder why they just seem to get big agencies.

 

Right from the outset, it helps to know that interpreters deal with spoken or signed languages and translators deal with written languages. Next up, it is useful to remember that different types of event require different types of interpreters.

 

Are you hosting or organising a multilingual conference or product launch? Track down a conference interpreter. Do you have a business meeting to hammer out a new contract? You will need a business interpreter or a business negotiation interpreter. Looking for someone to help with a court case? You will need a court interpreter.

 

The more specific you are, the better your chances of finding the right interpreter from the outset. While some interpreters cover more than one field, you will always be better finding someone who has experience in the type of event you are running.

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Doing Great Marketing? Then #BackItUp

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: February 17, 2017

If your marketing budget is greater than your CPD budget, you have a problem

As is probably clear from all the posts on working with a CRM, pitching and writing for clients, I have been on a marketing binge so far this year and it is really paying off. I have caught the attention of new clients and have projects in various stages of being booked in. But it’s not enough to have great marketing; you have to #BackItUp with exceptional delivery.

 

By #BackItUp, I don’t mean having copies of your data stored in lots of places, as good an idea as that is. I mean that every hour spent on marketing needs to be supported by an hour spent on improving practice, especially since no one grows accidentally.

 

You can sell yourself as a premium provider all you like but if you deliver services that are more akin to the stuff you might buy out of someone’s car boot on a rainy Tuesday afternoon, you will hit a problem. The most powerful form of marketing is still recommendations and people will soon know whether you are as good as you claim to be.

 

Why do we think that some companies have massive rates of client turnover? If their marketing is good but they aren’t paying enough to work with great people, clients soon find out and look elsewhere. Whether you are an event interpreter, equipment supplier or events management company, if your marketing budget is greater than your CPD budget, you have a problem.

 

Since I am a French to English and English to French and conference interpreter based in Edinburgh, I absolutely have to be pushing my language and interpreting skills on a regular basis. That means keeping up-to-date with the latest research, practising specific areas of my performance, keeping my French honed and even listening back to myself.

 

So what do you do to #BackItUp? We can all learn from each other and get great new ideas for improving our practice. Why not share this post, alongside how you work on your skills and add the #BackItUp hashtag? Marketing is great but what we all need to #BackItUp.

4 Keys when Changing Event Interpreting Suppliers

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: February 2, 2017

If you have been organising international events for a while, you will know that there is a wide range of different event interpreting services, from big agencies, to individual interpreters. You will also know that getting the right interpreters for your conference is a vital part of making sure that the whole event works for every attendee. Here then are 4 issues you should bear in mind whenever you are changing interpreting suppliers or hiring one for the first time.

 

  1. Spot the warning signs of a bad supplier

Every interpreting agency and ever consultant interpreter will have their own standard ways of doing business but a number of these internal policies are simply there to guard their interests, rather than being there for your benefit.
A prime example is that some conference interpreting suppliers will ban you and the interpreters from speaking directly before the event starts. All good event managers knows that having short lines of communication is vital for the success of any event. It is therefore worth asking yourself whether it is really in your interests to have to go through a middle-person and rely on them relaying information accurately and completely, every time you have information to pass on.

 

Every interpreter in the business will have had occasions where they could not deliver the very best service because they were not given the right information at the right time. If your supplier is insisting on keeping the contact details of your interpreters secret and refuses to even tell you which interpreters they are using until the last minute, it is worth looking elsewhere.

 

A similar red flag should be raised if it seems that you find yourself dealing with someone different each time you talk to or email your supplier. You should have a single point of contact who manages the whole process.

 

One last, and more subtle red flag, should be raised if you come across a conference interpreting supplier who is happy to give you an instant quote for any job. Sure, it might seem that it makes your life easier and saves time but it tends to be a sign of a box-ticking approach to delivering service.

 

Your event is unique. You will have specialised content, a specific audience and your own set of KPIs to fulfil. For that reason, the interpreting delivered at your event will be unique too. It makes sense then that excellent suppliers will need a little time to build the right time and put together a price that is as unique as your event.

 

  1. Understand restrictions and eliminate those that are bad for you

Even the very best interpreting suppliers will likely have some restrictive clauses in any contracts they offer. It is common to see bans on contacting conference interpreters directly for a period of time, if you chose an agency to supply them for your event. It is also not unusual for event interpreting suppliers to ask for exclusivity deals and for conference interpreting equipment suppliers to work exclusively or semi-exclusively with a single booth manufacturer.

 

None of these, on their own, are wrong but it pays to ask which ones are right for you. It may be worth asking, for instance, whether you should be able to hire interpreters directly if you liked them but weren’t pleased with how their services were managed. You also may wish to have a clause allowing you to request for a different interpreting team for future events or different equipment.

 

Remember, you are the buyer and it is up to you to decide which restrictions are worth allowing and which will get in the way of delivery.

 

  1. Understand the strengths of the three main event interpreting solutions

There are three ways to manage event interpreters. Either you locate and manage each interpreter yourself, or you call in a consultant to create and manage the team or you book through an agency. There are no wrong answers but each solution does have its pros and cons.

 

If you hire interpreters for your event directly, you get a short chain of communication and you grow to know your team really well. This is often the cheapest option too.  However, this comes at the cost of having to spend time finding interpreters and somehow checking that they are good enough and then doing the admin to pay them all!

 

Hiring a consultant gives you contact with someone whose job it is to build the team for you and who has most likely worked with most, if not all of the team before. Their prices are often cheaper than agencies. They become your single point of contact and so you still get to keep a short chain of communication, especially if, as usually happens, they are actually interpreting as well as consulting. The disadvantage is that they may not have the same coverage as an agency and so for complex jobs, an agency could be better. Their team might also be busy just at the time when you want them.

 

Of all the solutions, agencies are the best at doing large-scale jobs. Their advantage is usually found in their ability to find lots of interpreters covering lots of languages, in a short space of time. Working with an agency also means less admin and only one bill to pay for you. The price of this, however, is usually that their fees are higher and that your chain of communication is longer, increasing the risk that something will get lost along the way.

 

  1. Look for people happy to talk through your options and your situation

If all this seems confusing, it shouldn’t be. All you need is a guide who can walk through your decisions with you. Whether you chat to someone from an agency about their solutions and prices or to a consultant about your management process, it will help to have someone lead you through the process.

 

Since your situation and events are unique, it will help to find someone who is open to creating something unique for you. If you are looking at changing your interpreting provider, feel free to get in touch. I would love to guide you through the process.

 

 

Why Event Managers Should Beware of Package Deals

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: January 10, 2017

Great event managers are always on the lookout for ways to simplify processes. They will learn scheduling and automation tools, return to the same suppliers, and integrate technology throughout the process. Yet sometimes, that instinct for simplification can lead to poor decision-making, that is especially the case where interpreting is concerned.

Let me explain how this can happen. For many conferences, especially where interpreting is needed into more than one language, there will be a need to book soundproof interpreting booths, headsets and various microphones, as well as the interpreters themselves. Some Audio Visual equipment (AV) suppliers, having noticed that their clients want to keep things simple, now offer to supply the interpreters for free, if the events agency give them the contract for AV equipment hire.

 

It sounds like a good deal. They get a nice contract and you can tick two items off your to-do list at once. So what’s the problem?

 

The big issue with package deals like this is that they put AV suppliers in a position where the biggest potential drain on profits is the service that represents the biggest risk and greatest potential benefit to you. Your delegates probably won’t notice much of a difference between a set-up based on XLR cables versus one using CAT-5s. They will notice the difference between professionally trained and prepared interpreters and people who just learned the language on holiday.

Since the AV providers already have the equipment, payment to interpreters will be the biggest risk to their profit margins. That, in turn, can lead to them trying to find ways to save money on the interpreting itself. This is the same interpreting your clients are relying on for the meeting to be a success.

 

All professional interpreters have a minimum fee and the AV suppliers who take the package deal approach may negotiate hard to reduce these minimum fees. If you hire interpreters directly or via a reputable agency, these agencies and consultants will know that the return on investment of great interpreting is always higher than its costs. These same interpreting specialists will also know who the great interpreters are and how much it will cost to get them on board.

 

So, while package deals are tempting, it always pays to ask yourself whether such deals sacrifice quality on the altar of speed. If you want the kind of interpreting that ensures your event has the right impact, it will always pay to go to a reputable agency or an experienced consultant.

How to be More Successful in 2017

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: January 6, 2017

Happy New Year!

 

After an exhausting 2016, many business leaders are excited and anxious about what this year may bring. All of us hope to do better this year than last year but, despite all the tips and tricks we might read about online, we might now know how. Here are three strategies I have found to be indispensable.

 

Key 1: Define Your Own Success

 

As both a business owner and a dad, I have no shortage of people offering me their tricks and tips and must-dos. Yet what is glaringly obvious is that most people will give you advice after making the assumption that you want the same things out of life that they do.

 

If I am going to be any more successful this year than I was last year, it will mean being clear about what I mean by “successful”.  More than that, with all of us under continual time pressure, actually knowing what success looks like makes it much easier to say ‘yes’ to the right things and ‘no’ to the wrong things.

 

Since I know the types of clients I want and the kinds of marketing that seem to work for me, I know to ignore anyone selling their latest gimmick. Since I know my priorities, I can also confidently ignore anyone who says that you can’t be a success unless you work 25 hours a day and wake up at 4am, having gone to bed at 5.

 

Key 2: Prioritise Personal Growth

 

In the translation and interpreting community, 2016 was a year where there seemed to be more courses and classes and conferences on offer than ever before. In the events industry too, it seems that people are more aware of the need for Continued Professional Development than ever.

 

The simple reason for this is that every penny invested in a good source of personal and professional growth pays off. I recently read two papers where it was found that the best way to improve sales performance was to set both sales targets and targets for what you wanted to learn.

 

Given how fast technology and business practice is moving, those businesses that sell more will be those where everyone is committed to staying consistently at the top of their game.

 

For event managers, that will mean staying up to date with changes in marketing and shifts in delegate expectations while learning how to integrate new technology. For interpreters, that will mean clocking up the practice hours, diving into specialist subjects and continually honing our approaches to clients.

 

Key 3: Find a Community

 

This last one is by far the most important. Remember how people go on about SMART goals? Well it turns out that the only way they actually have a real effect is when you mix them with regular accountability.

 

In fact, the more research I read, the more important I realise that it is to make sure that you are in a community where you can be supported to grow. No matter how senior you are in your company, you will need someone to listen when times are tough … and a little push when you have started coasting.

 

No-one grows consistently on their own. This year, perhaps the greatest gift you could give your own success would be to find a group of people who are trying to be more successful too.

The Difficult Second Album

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: December 16, 2016

Everyone gets excited about the start of something new and the first job for a new client is always a good one. But what happens after that?

Once you have set the bar and delivered for the first time, where do you go next? Of course, consistency is key and everyone likes to get excellent service every time but what happens when your work is so good, it is taken for granted?

To become the “go to” person or to go from being great to getting referrals, you have to learn how to go from great delivery to stand out performer. Just as no band can make their entire career out of a single album, no provider can truly build a business on just delivering one way for a single client.

You are going to need to grow and create and innovate. The same tools what landed you job #1 will need to be refined and even rethought to land job #2. Seasons and fashions change and it takes skill to keep growing through them all.

Here’s a very concrete example. I soon realised that doing one good job for a specific agency client is no guarantee that you will ever be called again. If you want to get another assignment, you will need to follow up and make sure you are still as visible as you were before. It’s hard work but the results are always worth it.

So where has complacency set in in your business? Which of your clients have lost their passion for what you are selling? Maybe it’s time to try something new.

The Business Clients Call for the Hard Stuff

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: December 9, 2016

What type of interpreter or events manager are you? Do you get the run of the mill, straightforward stuff or are you called in when it is tricky?

There will always be simple work in every field and tons of people to do it. If you locate yourself at the high volume end of the market, there will be lots of opportunities but just as much competition. There both service and rates matter. With the importance of each of those dependent on the client and assignment.

At the tricky end, there is less work but much less competition. Some of your colleagues won’t want to even touch those projects. If you deliver on them, you win yourself not just praise but great respect and more negotiating power.

How many interpreters can confidently deal with live media work? How many event managers can deal with a multilingual, multi-strand, multi-site conference?

The people who get called for the hard stuff will always be in demand. Are you one of them?

By the way, if you are looking for interpreters who can deliver challenging assignments with aplomb, let’s talk.

The Intellectual Dishonesty of “Only”

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: December 7, 2016

Content Marketing is not the only kind of marketing left. Only £10 per month is still £120 per year. There is not “only” one way to work with interpreters.

Whenever someone wants to minimise a downside or blind you to alternatives, they will use “only”. The truth is, there are always many options and many routes. Nothing is ever as simple as it looks.

There are several ways to organise events and all of them will give different results. There are several ways to hire interpreters – each has its own advantages and disadvantages. Anyone who tries to tell you that their way is the only way that works is not telling the full story.

Instead of looking for the only way or the price that is only the same as a cappuccino, strip off the qualifiers and read again. The truth is often uncomfortable but it should never be ignored.

Don’t just read the book

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: November 30, 2016

Business owners have never had it so good. We have almost any kind of information at our fingertips. Need marketing advice? You can get it in seconds. Need to get more work-life balance? You can read up on it anytime.
We have all this information but I am not sure that we are actually benefiting from it. In translation and Interpreting, there are some amazing books on personal and business growth but some of us are still making the same mistakes. Why?
Just reading a book will never be enough. To actually learn from it, you need to do the book. A single page applied does us more good than ten chapters just read. There is no point in finishing a book if it hasn’t done you any good.
So the next time you find yourself reading a thought-provoking book, take notes. How can you apply it to your business or service delivery today? Pick one action, one goal and spend six weeks applying it. Once you have applied it, evaluate your results. Then and only then, will it be time to turn the next page.
It’s hard work but it’s much more useful than having a full bookshelf but an empty bank account.