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The End of Face-to-Face Events?

By: Jonathan Downie    Date: June 1, 2016

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It’s every tech nerd’s dream and most event managers’ nightmare. With increasing environmental concern and ever-improving technology, might the days of face-to-face events be numbered? Now that internet speeds are (mostly) at the point where we can have video chats without our faces looking like a seven-year-old’s Minecraft creation, is there any sense in hiring expensive rooms, flying halfway across Europe and meeting together for a few days, before jetting off home again?

Ironically, I am writing this as I do the preparatory work for my trip to The Meetings Show in the London Olympia as a visitor. Since I live in Edinburgh, this has meant arranging travel and deciding whether to stay overnight. Yet the very fact I have decided that it is worth the rigmarole of checking-in, going through security, avoiding the ladies in the Duty Free (thanks for so kindly making us walk all the way through that, Edinburgh Airport!) and finding the gate, is part of the answer.

The short answer to the future of face-to-face events was one given by Prof. Barry Olsen during a podcast I recorded with him and Alexander Drechsel on remote interpreting. His take? “Face-to-face events will only end when someone finds a way for people to drink beer virtually.”

And that’s pretty much it. What you get in person is precisely the feeling of being there in person. It’s the ability to have a relaxed chat with potential clients over coffee, the opportunity for a chance encounter with an industry leader, the networking that accidentally happens when you flop onto a seat next to someone charging their phone (true story!)…

We all know that it is important to simply be there. If that is true then why is so much of our tech about automation and reducing the input of people? Geo-beacons send people content based on where they happen to be standing; event registration tools let people sign up and collect their badge without talking to anyone; livestreaming beams the content to people on another continent; remote interpreting further separates the speaker from the people whose voices will captivate a large section of the audience.

For meetings to reach their full potential, they need to be human. For interpreting to give the maximum value, the interpreters need to be drinking the same excitement and atmosphere as everyone else.

Event tech is great and remote interpreting has its uses but, the more we realise the true value of face-to-face events, the more we realise that the experience of being in the same room is at the heart of what we do. Great events put people at their centre and make networking and sharing core to the whole experience. Tech is great but connection is still king.

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